Trait #5 - Sentence Fluency

5 rating:

  • The writing flows from one word to another and from one idea to another.  Sentences are well-built, with consistently strong and varied structure that gives them a sense of movement.
  • Sentence structure reflects logic and sense, helping to show how ideas relate.  Purposeful sentence beginnings guide the reader from one sentence to another.
  • The writing sounds natural and fluent; it glides along with one sentence flowing effortlessly to another.
  • Sentences display an effective combination of power and grace.
  • Variation in sentence structure and length adds interest to the text.


3 Rating:

  • The text moves efficiently for the most part, though it may lack a certain rhythm.  It is more mechanical than fluid.
  • The writer shows adequate control over simple sentence structure, and less control over more complex sentence structure.
  • Sentences don't seem skillfully crafted, but they are grammatical and solid.  They hang together.  They get the job done.
  • The writer may tend to favor a particular pattern (e.g., subject-verb, subject-verb,) but there is at least some variation in sentence length and structure (sentence beginnings are not all alike).
  • The reader sometimes has to hunt for clues (e.g., connecting words like however, therefore, naturally, on the other hand, to be specific, for example, next, first of all, later still, etc.) that show how one sentence leads into the next.
  • Some parts may seem choppy or awkward.


1 Rating:

  • This paper is difficult to follow or read.  Most sentences tend to be choppy, incomplete, rambling, or awkward; they need work.  More than one of the following problems is likely to be evident:
  • Sentences do not sound natural.  Word patterns are often jarring or irregular, forcing the reader to pause or read over.
  • Sentence structure seems to obscure meaning, rather than showing the reader how ideas relate.
  • Word patterns are monotonous.  There is little or no real variety in length or structure.
  • Sentences may be very choppy.  Or, words may run together in one giant "sentence," linked by "and's" or other connectives.

 

Sentence Style

Integrating Quotes

Relative Clauses and Participles

Appositives Absolutes and Prepositional Phrases

Fragments

Fused Sentences

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